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Learn the Facts

Young people face an extraordinary risk when it comes to substance use. The brain continues to develop well into the 20s, and using alcohol or other drugs in this developmental phase can permanently alter the structure of the brain, “wiring” it for addiction and inhibiting memory and problem-solving abilities. Explore this page to learn more facts about substance use – and to find answers to your child’s questions and your own.

Fentanyl Facts

  • an extremely potent opioid that is stronger than heroin
  • usually obtained by young people from family or friends with prescriptions
  • also sold illegally, often in combination with or under the name of other drugs
  • just because doctors prescribe it doesn’t make it safe
  • accounts for 77% of overdose deaths among adolescents

Learn About Substances

Click on a button to learn more.
  • Opioids
  • Fentanyl
  • Alcohol
  • Marijuana
  • Prescription Medication
  • E-Cigarettes and Vapes

Opioids

Opioids trigger a surge of dopamine in the brain, causing an intense feeling of pleasure and a strong desire to make that pleasure last, even if the behavior that caused it is harmful. Over time, however, users require more and more of the drug to experience pleasure, or even to feel normal. This effect is exaggerated in young people, whose developing brains are more supple, making them more susceptible to addiction and dependency. Long-term opioid use can cause irreversible changes in the brain, inhibiting the user’s ability not only to feel pleasure but also to form memories and interact socially with others.

Answer Their Questions

“What’s an opioid?”

Opioids are drugs that target the opioid receptors in the brain, including illegal drugs like heroin as well as prescription medications like oxycodone and morphine.

“But if opioids are prescribed by doctors, they must be safe for me to try, right?”

Just because a doctor prescribes a drug doesn’t make it safe. Opioids are prescribed by doctors to treat severe pain resulting, for example, from serious injuries, surgery, or debilitating diseases like cancer. When prescribing opioids, doctors consider a number of different factors. Without talking to a doctor, you can’t know how a given opioid will affect you. Even with a prescription, opioids carry serious risks and can have harmful or fatal side effects, especially when misused. You should never take prescription opioids from a friend or family member, even if you’re in pain, as it’s extremely dangerous. Plus, there are illegally produced counterfeit pills out there that might look like a prescription pill you recognize but did not come from a doctor. These pills can contain life-threatening drugs or chemicals.

“I’ve never used an opioid, but some of my friends have. How can I help them?”

Opioids are extremely dangerous drugs, and overdose is always a risk. Naloxone is an opioid overdose reversal drug that anyone can obtain at any age without an ID. I can help you get some. By carrying naloxone, you could potentially decrease the chances of a friend suffering a fatal overdose. If you ever suspect a friend is overdosing, your first step should be to call 911. A law called the “The Good Samaritan Law” protects you and your friend from getting into trouble if you seek help during a drug-related overdose.

“I don’t think I would ever use an opioid. Do you?”

I am proud of your decision to not use opioids. You’ll face a lot of tough decisions throughout your life, and sometimes you might make the wrong choice. Just know that you can always talk to me, no matter what – even if you’ve made a mistake and find yourself in a situation you can’t find your way out of. I won’t freak out. I’ll figure out a way to help.

Know The Facts

The current opioid epidemic is one of the largest drug epidemics in U.S. history. Opioids include prescription medications used to treat pain as well as illegal drugs such as heroin.

Q&A

  • How can I tell if someone is using opioids?

    Regardless of the opioid in question, the physical signs and symptoms of opioid intoxication are all the same. They include pinpoint pupils, flushed skin, drowsiness, needle marks, slurred speech, slow reflexes, and mood swings. In addition to physical signs, you may also notice missing medications, empty pill bottles, or paraphernalia such as syringes, lengths of rubber hose, or burnt kitchen spoons.

  • What should I do if I have prescription opioids in my home?

    Safe storage and disposal of medications can help keep your loved ones safe. Studies have shown that 53% of children over the age of 12 who misused prescription opioids obtained them from family or friends with prescriptions. Keep medications in their original packaging and securely stored. Consider storing them in a locked cabinet, lockbox, or other location where they can’t be easily accessed. It is also important to dispose of unused, unwanted, or expired medications at a local safe disposal site. Search the web for “Safe Disposal Sites, US Department of Justice” to find sites near you.

Other Health Effects of Opioids

The greatest risks associated with opiate use are addiction and overdose. In 2016, one in five deaths among young people were related to opioids.

Opioid use may also lead to serious injury due to inhibited coordination and mobility.

Other effects include tooth decay, breathing difficulty, compromised immune function, chronic constipation, and heart attack.

Fentanyl

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid, meaning it is made in a lab and mimics the chemical structure of naturally occurring opioids like morphine. Yet it is 50-100 times more potent than morphine, making it far more dangerous. It is used by doctors to treat extreme pain, most commonly in the cases of advanced cancer patients. Illegally produced or distributed fentanyl is now one of the most common drugs involved in drug overdose deaths, particularly because it is often combined with or sold as other drugs. Among adolescents, fentanyl accounts for 77% of overdose deaths.

Answer Their Questions

“What’s fentanyl?”

Fentanyl is an extremely dangerous opioid that’s more potent than heroin. It accounts for more overdose deaths than any other drug. Doctors use it to treat pain only in the most severe cases. But it’s also made and sold illegally and sometimes combined with or passed off as other drugs. You can’t taste it, smell it, or see it, and an amount equal to two grains of salt could be enough to cause an overdose.

“But if it’s prescribed by doctors, it must be safe to try, right?”

Just because a doctor prescribes a drug doesn’t make it safe. When prescribing fentanyl, doctors consider a number of different factors. Without talking to a doctor, you can’t know how it will affect you. Even with a prescription, it carries serious risks and can have harmful or fatal side effects, especially when misused. You should never take fentanyl from a friend or family member, even if you’re in pain, as it’s extremely dangerous. Plus, there are illegally produced counterfeit pills out there that might look like a prescription pill you recognize but that did not come from a doctor. These pills can contain life-threatening drugs or chemicals.

Know The Facts

Fentanyl is one of the most common drugs involved in overdose deaths.

Q&A

  • How can I tell if someone is using fentanyl?

    Regardless of the opioid in question, the physical signs and symptoms of opioid intoxication are all the same. They include pinpoint pupils, flushed skin, drowsiness, needle marks, slurred speech, slow reflexes, and mood swings. In addition to physical signs, you may also notice missing medications, empty pill bottles, or notices for unordered prescriptions.

  • What should I do if I have prescription fentanyl in my home?

    Safe storage and disposal of medications can help keep your loved ones safe. Studies have shown that 53% of children over the age of 12 who misused prescription opioids obtained them from family or friends with prescriptions. Keep medications in their original packaging and securely stored. Consider storing them in a locked cabinet, lockbox, or other location where they can’t be easily accessed. It is also important to dispose of unused, unwanted, or expired medications at a local safe disposal site. Search the internet for “Safe Disposal Sites, US Department of Justice” to find sites near you.

Other Health Effects of Fentanyl

The greatest risks associated with fentanyl use are addiction and overdose. Among adolescents, fentanyl accounts for 77% of overdose deaths.

Fentanyl use may also lead to serious injury due to inhibited coordination and mobility.

Other effects include tooth decay, breathing difficulty, compromised immune function, chronic constipation, and heart attack.

Alcohol

The legal drinking age is 21 – and for good reason. This limit is based on the fact that the human brain continues to develop well into adulthood. Using alcohol or drugs in this developmental phase can interfere with the reward center of the brain, wiring it for addiction. Research suggests that people who start drinking alcohol at a young age are more likely to continue the habit into adulthood. In fact, people who begin drinking under 15 are six times more likely to develop a drinking problem than those who begin drinking after 21.

Answer Their Questions

​​“Come on. Underage drinking isn’t that big a deal, is it?”

The age limit for alcohol is based on research showing that young people react differently to alcohol. Teens get drunk twice as quickly as adults and have more trouble knowing when to stop. Drinking even a small amount can cloud your judgment and cause you to put yourself in a risky situation where you or someone else gets hurt. I don’t want that for you.

​​“I only drink socially. That’s OK, isn’t it?”

Thank you for your honesty. I appreciate that you can be open with me about this. Right now, your brain is in the middle of a really important phase of its development. Drinking during this phase can actually interfere with that development and make you more prone to addiction. In fact, research shows that taking your first drink in your early teens puts you at a much greater risk of developing a serious problem with alcohol or other drugs later in life.

​​“Everybody I know drinks, and they all seem fine. What am I missing?”

I am hoping you will make your own choice, and I am here to help you with that. Alcohol can cause permanent damage to your brain, particularly as it relates to memory, motor skills, and coordination. It’s also a leading factor in sexual assault and the top three causes of teen deaths: car accidents, homicide, and suicide. I’m not saying this to scare you. I just want you to have the facts about alcohol’s effects.

​​“Did you drink/smoke when you were young?”

When I was young, we didn’t know nearly as much as we do now about the risks involved. Recent research has revealed just how harmful it is to drink during the teenage years when your brain is still developing.

Know The Facts

There are many reasons why teens drink, including the social pressure to fit in, the idea that most of their friends are drinking, or because they simply don’t realize how harmful it can be to their developing brain and body.

Q&A

  • Why is the drinking age 21?

    The age limit for drinking is based on research showing that young people react differently to alcohol. Their bodies respond twice as quickly to alcohol as those of adults, and they have a harder time knowing when to stop.

  • What are the risks of drinking for young people?

    Alcohol impairs judgment and lowers inhibitions. It makes young people do things they might not otherwise do and take risks they might not otherwise take, including driving under the influence or riding with an impaired driver. Underage drinking can also affect social development, especially if teens rely on alcohol as a means of coping. Studies show that young people who use alcohol may have difficulty making lasting friendships.

  • Can parents teach their teens how to drink responsibly by giving them small amounts of alcohol?

    There’s no evidence to suggest that this approach actually works; in fact, there is evidence to the contrary. When teens feel they have their parents’ approval to drink, they tend to drink more often and in larger amounts. When parents have concrete, enforced rules about alcohol, young people drink less.

Other Health Effects of Alcohol

Alcohol disrupts sleep and interferes with sleep patterns by reducing time spent in deep restful sleep.

Alcohol is a diuretic and causes the body to lose important vitamins and minerals required for athletic performance.

Alcohol disrupts the muscle-building process as alcohol is metabolized first, pushing aside other nutrients needed for muscle recovery.

Alcohol spikes the production of cortisol, the body’s stress hormone, which impairs thinking, raises blood pressure, decreases bone density and muscle tissue, and increases abdominal fat.

Marijuana

The brain continues to develop well into the 20s, and using marijuana during this phase can permanently damage the structure of the brain, specifically the areas dealing with memory and problem solving. Regular marijuana use by children or adolescents can lead to an IQ drop of up to eight points. Students who use marijuana regularly (defined as once a week or more) tend to get lower grades and are more likely to drop out of high school.

Answer Their Questions

“But marijuana is legal in California. Doesn’t that mean it’s OK for me to use it?”

It’s still illegal for anyone under 21. This age limit is meant to protect adolescents from its harmful effects. Your brain is completing some very important development, and using marijuana during this time can interfere with that development, specifically in the areas dealing with memory and problem solving.

​​“But marijuana comes from nature. Doesn’t that make it safe?”

Just because it’s “natural” doesn’t mean it’s safe. Because it remains federally illegal, there are few regulations ensuring that marijuana meets safety guidelines. Its strength and potency can vary widely, and it often contains a large quantities of pesticides, fungus, and even lead. Now that it has become “big business” funded by large tobacco companies, there is not much “natural” about it.

“But it helps with my anxiety. Can’t I use it for that?”

I am sorry you’re feeling anxious; I know how that feels. While marijuana may make you feel relaxed while you’re using it, it can actually make you feel worse in the long run. A chemical in marijuana, THC, mimics one of the brain’s neurotransmitters that makes you feel good, reducing the amount your body makes on its own. Once you’ve become dependent on THC, you’ll feel good when you’re using it, but you won’t have enough of your own chemical messengers to feel good when you’re not using it. Maybe together we can think of some other ways to help you relax?

“Would you rather I drink alcohol? Marijuana seems safer.”

Honestly, I don’t want you doing anything that can harm you. I’m interested in knowing why you think marijuana is safer than alcohol. There’s a lot of misinformation out there about marijuana, and it’s important to understand that marijuana is as dangerous as alcohol on the developing brain. Teens who begin using marijuana often have difficulty with emotions, lose motivation for school, and jeopardize lifelong friendships. Right now, neither option seems like a healthy choice.

“Is it okay to drive if you’ve smoked marijuana since it is legal?”

That's a good question, and I'm glad you’re asking it. It is never safe to get behind the wheel of a car while under the influence, and getting in the car with someone who has been drinking or using drugs like marijuana is also dangerous. Just like alcohol, marijuana can impair your judgment, meaning it is not safe to drive while under the influence. Not only is it not safe – it’s illegal to operate a car while under the influence of marijuana and can result in a DUI. This holds true for all drugs, including some prescription medications. If you are ever in a situation where you do not feel safe to drive or to get in the car with someone else, you can always call me.

Know The Facts

There are physical and mental health consequences for young people who use marijuana while the brain is still developing. Using marijuana during this time can interfere with the reward center of the brain, “wiring” it for addiction. It can also inhibit attention, motivation, memory, and learning.

Q&A

  • How strong is today’s marijuana?

    Today’s marijuana is almost 300% stronger than it was in the 1980s and can contain around 18% THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), its main psychoactive ingredient. This high level of THC poses a greater risk for young people and has been linked to depression, anxiety, and other mental illnesses. It has also led to an increase in emergency room visits for increased heart rate, psychosis, vomiting, and panic attacks.

  • How does marijuana impact driving ability?

    Marijuana inhibits concentration, quick reactions, and coordination. These skills are impaired for at least four to six hours after using marijuana, long after the “high” is gone. The effects are made worse when marijuana is combined with alcohol. In Colorado, marijuana-related driving deaths increased more than 66% after the state legalized marijuana in 2013.

Other Health Effects of Marijuana

The risk of a heart attack is several times higher after using marijuana, which increases blood pressure and causes the heart to beat about 50% faster.

Using marijuana reduces oxygen in the blood, forcing the body to work harder to perform normal functions.

Marijuana use affects hormones in boys and girls and interferes with testosterone production.

Young people may think that marijuana helps with anxiety. The chemicals found in marijuana mimic one of the brain’s neurotransmitters, which makes the user feel good. Yet it reduces the amount the body makes on its own. Once dependent on THC, they will feel good when they are using it, but they may feel anxious and depressed without it.

Marijuana smoke contains many of the same toxins and carcinogens as tobacco smoke and causes the same respiratory illnesses. It deposits four times as much tar in the lungs as tobacco because it is unfiltered and inhaled more deeply.

Prescription Medication

Prescription medications are those drugs, including opioids, depressants, and stimulants, that cannot be legally obtained without a prescription from a doctor. The fact that doctors sometimes prescribe them, however, does not mean that they are safe to use. On the contrary, their use is regulated precisely because they are dangerous and unpredictable, producing different effects in different people and often harmful or even fatal side effects. Young people are at greater risk of becoming addicted to prescription medications because their brains are still developing, a process that drugs can inhibit.

Answer Their Questions

“Why are we talking about this?”

Prescription drugs may not pose a temptation for you now, but that could change down the road. If that happens, I want you to know the facts so you can make an informed decision – or help your friends do so.

“What’s the big deal?”

Your brain is enormously flexible, learns rapidly, and contains more neurons than an adult brain. That’s why it can more quickly become addicted to prescription medications or other drugs.

​​“But if these drugs are prescribed by doctors, they must be safe to try, right?”

Just because a doctor prescribes a drug doesn’t make it safe. When prescribing drugs, doctors consider a number of different factors. Without talking to a doctor, you can’t know how a given drug will affect you. Even with a prescription, drugs carry serious risks and can have harmful or fatal side effects, especially when misused. You should never take them from a friend or family member, even if you’re in pain, as it’s extremely dangerous. Plus, there are illegally produced counterfeit pills out there that might look like a prescription pill you recognize but that did not come from a doctor. These pills can contain life-threatening drugs or chemicals.

“You don’t understand. I am under a lot of stress right now, and this helps.”

I hear you’re feeling overwhelmed, but I don’t want you making choices that can hurt you. I want you to be able to cope with life’s ups and downs in a healthy way. If you are under a lot of stress, then let’s brainstorm some ideas on how to reduce your stress. If you think it would be helpful, we can speak with a professional for more guidance.

​​“But it helps with my anxiety. Isn’t that reason enough to use it?”

These drugs are very addictive because they produce a flood of dopamine – the brain’s “feel-good” messenger. When someone uses drugs to artificially raise their dopamine levels, it damages the brain’s ability to produce dopamine naturally, making it harder to feel good without the drug. This is what makes it hard to stop using drugs. And that’s why it’s important that these types of drugs be taken under a doctor’s care, so that they can properly diagnose and prescribe the correct dosage.

“Kids at school are using Adderall to get better grades. Why shouldn’t I?”

I am proud of your hard work and of the grades you earned without relying on stimulants. I understand that there is a lot of pressure to do well. But using a drug to do better on tests (or sports) is cheating, and research has shown it is actually tied to getting lower grades. And there are some serious side effects of misusing stimulants. Why don’t we explore other relaxation and time management skills to help you?

Know The Facts

Each year, over half a million young people misuse or abuse prescription drugs for the first time, and that number is on the rise. Prescription drugs are often believed to be less dangerous than illegal drugs, when in fact many of them are more dangerous.

Q&A

  • What qualifies as prescription drug misuse or abuse?

    Prescription drug misuse means taking a medication without a prescription or without following the instructions of the prescribing physician or drug manufacturer. Examples include taking a higher dose than prescribed or recommended, mixing the drug with alcohol or other drugs, or using a drug for a purpose other than that for which it was intended. Prescription drug abuse means taking a medication not to treat a medical condition but for the sole purpose of experiencing the feelings caused by the drug, such as euphoria or relaxation.

  • Why do young people misuse and abuse prescription drugs?

    Young people use prescription drugs for a variety of reasons: for pleasure, for relief from pain or stress, to self-medicate for untreated anxiety or depression, or because they mistakenly believe that drugs will help them do better in school. Reasons for misusing substances differ between young women and young men. Young men are more likely to take stimulants to get high while young women are more likely to take them to make up for lack of sleep or to lose weight.

Other Health Effects of Prescription Medication

Opioids such as Vicodin, OxyContin, and codeine are prescribed to relieve pain and can cause drowsiness, nausea, and constipation. In 2016, one in five deaths among young people were related to opioids.

Depressants such as Valium and Xanax are prescribed to relieve anxiety or help with sleep. They can cause slurred speech, fatigue, low blood pressure, disorientation, lack of coordination, and seizures.

Stimulants such as Adderall and Ritalin are prescribed for treating attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). They have many of the same side effects as cocaine, including paranoia, dangerously high body temperatures, and arrhythmia. High doses can cause heart failure and seizures.

E-Cigarettes and Vapes

E-cigarettes and vapes are delivery devices for nicotine, the same harmful and highly addictive stimulant found in tobacco. These devices work by heating a nicotine-containing liquid, or “e-liquid,” into a vapor that can be inhaled. Contrary to popular belief, e-cigarettes and vapes are not safer or less addictive than cigarettes. E-liquid can contain up to 2,000 ingredients, including carcinogens and other known toxins, which, along with nicotine, can lead to heart disease and cancer.

Answer Their Questions

“Why don’t you want me to use e-cigarettes?”

E-cigarettes might seem like a safer way to smoke, but they’re not. A lot of people think they contain nothing more than flavored water and are harmless. But in fact, the heated vapor contains all sorts of harmful chemicals that are inhaled directly into the lungs. Even breathing secondhand e-liquid vapor is dangerous. I’m glad we’re talking about this because it’s a concerning trend, and I want you to have the facts.

“I thought e-cigarettes didn’t have nicotine, just water and flavoring.”

I used to think so, too. But many e-liquids contain large quantities of nicotine, even if the packaging says otherwise. E-liquids have been found to contain more than 2,000 ingredients, including propylene glycol, formaldehyde, arsenic, and cadmium. These are toxins that damage your lungs and are known to cause cancer.

“What’s the big deal?”

Your brain is still growing and changing and will continue to do so till you’re about 25. Smoking before then can inhibit your brain’s development and increase your chances of becoming addicted. Using nicotine at your age may make it harder for you to concentrate, learn, or control your impulses. I want you to know these things because nothing is more important to me than your health and safety.

“Aren’t e-cigarettes safer than conventional cigarettes?”

Because your brain is still developing, studies show that it isn’t safe for you to use any product that contains nicotine, including e-cigarettes. Whether you get nicotine from an e-cigarette or a cigarette, it’s still highly addictive and not good for you. Plus, nicotine is just one of the thousands of chemicals that e-liquid can contain.

Know The Facts

E-cigarettes – also known as vapes, vape pens, or e-cigs – may look like pens, USB drives, or highlighters and may be used for highly concentrated marijuana and other drugs as well as nicotine.

Q&A

  • What’s in e-cigarettes and vapes?

    E-liquid can contain more than 2,000 chemicals, including propylene glycol, which is found in antifreeze; diacetyl, a chemical linked to lung disease; benzene, which is found in car exhaust; and heavy metal particles, such as lead. These chemicals are particularly harmful when they are heated and inhaled directly into the lungs, bypassing the body’s filtration system.

  • Why do the manufacturers of e-cigarettes and vapes market to young people?

    Vapes come in flavors that appeal to children because manufacturers know that the earlier they gain a customer, the more likely it is that that customer will remain a customer for life. Young people are more sensitive to nicotine and develop dependency more quickly than adults. Approximately three out of four adolescents who try tobacco products will end up addicted to nicotine as adults.

  • What are the signs that someone is using an e-cigarette or vape?

    Flavored e-cigarettes may give off a sweet smell of fruit, mint, or bubble gum. Unflavored e-cigarettes, however, can be hard to detect, being virtually odorless and smoke-free. The chemicals found in e-liquid may result in a dry mouth, cough, or nose bleeds. Finding chargers or empty e-liquid containers may also indicate that a family member is using them.

  • Why aren’t they regulated?

    In 2017, the FDA ruled that vapes should be regulated; however, companies have until 2022 to bring their products into compliance with FDA standards.

Other Health Effects of E-Cigarettes and Vapes

Secondhand vaping aerosol contains nicotine, volatile organic compounds, and other harmful chemicals, which can cause cancer, asthma, and heart disease.

Thirdhand vaping aerosol is the residue left behind on carpet, furniture, and other surfaces, which can contaminate anyone who comes into contact with it, especially young children and animals.

Responding to an Overdose

Taking drugs of any kind in amounts higher than necessary or recommended can lead to overdose, injury, or death. In the case of an overdose, it is important to know and identify the symptoms and act quickly. Symptoms can vary depending on what drug(s) was taken, how much was taken, how it was taken, the person’s age, and other factors.

Symptoms of a Drug Overdose

  • Passing out or loss of consciousness
  • Severe chest pain
  • Seizures
  • Severe headaches
  • Abnormal or difficulty breathing
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Changes in body temperature
  • Changes in skin color (pale bluish tint or flushed red tint)
  • Fast, slowed, or irregular pulse

How to Respond to a Drug Overdose

1Call 911 immediately. You only need to tell the dispatcher that someone is unresponsive and/or not breathing and provide an address and/or description of your location.

2If you know the victim has taken opiates, administer naloxone.

3Try to keep them awake and breathing. If necessary, perform rescue breathing.

4Place them on their side in the recovery position.

5Stay with them until emergency responders have arrived.

Some things not to do when responding to an overdose

DON’T hit or try forcefully to wake or move the person, which will only cause further injury. If you are unable to wake the person by shouting, lightly pinching them, or rubbing your knuckles on their sternum, then they have likely lost consciousness.

DON’T put the person in a cold bath or shower, which will only increase the risk of their falling, drowning, or going into shock.

DON’T try to make the person vomit, which will only increase the risk of their choking or inhaling vomit into the lungs.

More Information About Naloxone

Naloxone (brand name: Narcan) is a safe and effective medication that can quickly reverse an opioid overdose. It can be injected into the muscle or sprayed into the nose to rapidly block the effects of opioids on the body. Due to its lifesaving abilities, it is recommended that anyone who may encounter an individual who uses opiates, from law enforcement officers and medical providers to family and friends, carry naloxone with them at all times. Just as allergy sufferers keep an EpiPen on hand, opiate users should also have naloxone on hand, or at least know how to get it when needed. You can obtain naloxone from most pharmacies without a prescription and often at no cost. Watch the following video for step-by-step instructions on how to use Narcan Nasal Spray. You can also find written instructions here.

Other Drugs

Although this website focuses on opioids, fentanyl, alcohol, marijuana, prescription medications, and e-cigarettes and vapes, it is not uncommon for young people to use other substances, either on their own or in conjunction with the substances covered on this site. To learn more, visit teens.drugabuse.gov/parents by clicking the button below.

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